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Satire Marketing and Link Building Case Studies

4 example(s) in this category

How a Hilarious Dig at the Watch Industry Went Viral

Over 18,000 'upvotes'

If there’s one content angle I’m scared to try myself, it’s satire.

If you can write something convincingly enough that people know it’s fake but they have some doubts, you can find people sharing your story in the millions.

I’ve written more about succeeding with satire here.

A Reddit user named Morgenthau100 created a discussion in the /r/Watches sub-Reddit that became one of the most popular posts ever shared there.

He created an IMGUR album outlining how to create a popular watch brand.

As you can probably guess from the tone of this post, his suggestions could possibly be mistaken as serious, but were making fun of new brands in the space.

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How Using Satire Led to 43,000 Facebook Shares in One Week

43,000 facebook shares

If there’s one content angle I’m scared to try myself, it’s satire.

If you can write something convincingly enough that people know it’s fake but they have some doubts, you can find people sharing your story in the millions.

I’ve written more about succeeding with satire here.

Recently a blog named McSweeney’s wrote about how they only hire staff who are 23 years old because old people don’t have many creative ideas.

In less than a week the article has been shared on Facebook more than 43,000 times, undoubtedly sending a lot of first time visitors to the McSweeney’s website.

There is a lot of discussion these days on diversity when hiring people (even down to their age), so not only was the article cleverly written, it was also written at the perfect time.

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How An Entrepreneur ‘Struggling to Survive’ Went Viral

600+ medium hearts / 100+ comments

If there’s one piece of content I’m really scared to write, it’s satire.

If you can write something convincingly enough that people know it’s fake but they have some doubts you can find people sharing your story like crazy.

I’ve written more about it here.

Recently, Hackernoon contributor Lucas Roitman wrote about struggling to survive on a $250,000 salary.

The reason I think the piece worked so well is that you think there’s something ‘off’ about it when you’re reading, but you have to keep going to see if your suspicions are correct.

It’s so possibly true that you aren’t quite sure if you’re reading a serious piece.

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